November 2015

27 November 2015
It is common to have psoriasis flares which are highly visible around the hairline and on the scalp if you have psoriasis. Hair dyes unfortunately can further inflame your psoriatic scalp. So does it mean you have to give up colouring your grey roots or forgoing that trendy highlight of the season? Here are five tips to help you colour your hair safely if you choose to do so.
markedly
20 November 2015
A study cited that superantigens and toxins from Candida may play various roles in the exacerbation and persistence of psoriasis. 60 per cent of psoriasis subjects tested positive for Candida versus 20 per cent of the control group in oral tests and 15 per cent of psoriasis patients tested positive versus 4 per cent of the control group using skin tests. In order to heal the body and get rid of Candida, the gut needs to be healed.
markedly
13 November 2015
Stress has become such a normal part of our daily life that partners can become oblivious to the symptoms and warning signs. Stress is contagious and even if you try to ignore it, it can show up in our actions, words and behavior. Judy Ford, social worker and author of “Every Day Love: The Delicate Art of Caring for Each Other”, suggests 10 things couples can do to help take the stress out of their relationship.
markedly
6 November 2015
Inflammation is a defense strategy of the body against invaders. In the case of psoriasis, misdirected immune reactions can trigger inflammation even without external triggers thus causing undue tissue damage. This study shows that IL-4 very selectively and successfully suppresses inflammation and there may be opportunities to exploit its significance as a checkpoint in future treatments.
markedly

October 2015

30 October 2015
Relaxation techniques can help you manage your stress and cope with various health problems including psoriaisis. Most of these methods are free or low cost and can be done almost anywhere. They help by slowing your heart rate, lowering blood pressure, reducing activity of stress hormones, lowering fatique, anger or frustration or helping to boost confidence. This article gives you examples of relaxation techniques like autogenic relaxation, progressive muscle relaxation, visualization and more.
markedly
23 October 2015
The worst thing you can say to a stressed or depressed loved one is – “Snap out of it!” This is guaranteed to have them clamp up and withdraw from you. This article suggests some ways you can communicate and help your loved one in such situations. Suggestions include challenging and gently reminding them of the times they did well. And taking an indirect approach if you find a useful resource which may be of help, allowing them to choose to find out more themselves.
markedly
16 October 2015
Psoriasis is more than skin deep. Stress is an acknowledged trigger for psoriasis and can aggravate the condition. It was proposed at the American Academy of Dermatology’s Summer Academy that a combined approach incorporating stress management techniques into dermatological treatment can be beneficial. These combination strategies include psychotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, meditation, hypnosis, tai chi, yoga, and the use of antidepressants and beta blockers for associated depression.
markedly
9 October 2015
Although corticosteroid pills are not recommended for the long term management of psoriasis, research reveals these drugs are commonly prescribed by doctors treating this chronic skin condition. Unlike new therapies which have extensive clinical trials to prove efficacy, Corticosteroids have been available for decades but their use in psoriasis has not been extensively studied.
markedly
2 October 2015
If you have psoriasis and get pregnant, what is the impact of psoriasis on your pregnancy and how does pregnancy affect your psoriasis? It is reported that pregnancy can positively impact 60 per cent of women with psoriasis improving the condition dramatically, albeit temporarily. Increase in preterm delivery, low birth weights, severe blood pressure rise, placenta previa and pregnancy outside the uterus have been cited as effects in women with psoriasis but studies are not conclusive.
markedly

September 2015

25 September 2015
Working out is hard work but when you feel your pants or your skirt becoming a little looser, you’ll think it’s all worth it. However, some of you may be putting in the effort and time at the gym but not seeing any results. Frustrating, is it not? Well don’t give up. Here are five reasons why and how to get your workout to work for you.
markedly
18 September 2015
Tim Gunn offers practical fashion solutions to people who may feel that their wardrobe options are drastically limited with the physical symptoms like scaling and flaking that comes with psoriasis. He says, “It’s about self esteem. The clothes we wear send a message and affects how the world perceives us. When you know you look good and you feel good in your clothes, you navigate the world with an erect posture and great carriage and bearing, and you feel fantastic.”
markedly
16 September 2015
Psychological interventions can be used for a range of issues such as helping people change their behaviour, control their emotions and manage their feelings. Research published in the British Journal of Dermatology, found the symptoms of psoriasis can be improved through psychological interventions. >>
markedly
11 September 2015
When the right microorganisms are at work, immune cells involved in the development of autoimmune illnesses like psoriasis, multiple sclerosis and arthritis, can develop anti-inflammatory properties. Scientists have now demonstrated that particular fungi activate the immune cells involved in the development of certain illnesses, whereas other microorganisms, in particular bacteria that are found naturally on our skin, lend an anti-inflammatory function to them.
markedly
4 September 2015
People with psoriasis face multiple challenges in dealing with their condition and achieving physical wellness. Setting goals before you start is a good way of determining the way forward and achieving the results you want. The National Psoriasis Foundation speaks to Dr. Will Meek, a counseling psychologist in Vancouver for advice on goal setting and achieving positive outcomes.
markedly
2 September 2015
People with psoriasis often ask questions about supplements they should take sooner or later in the course of their treatment. Freedom 360 shares more about the three main types of supplements – vitamins and minerals, herb and plant extracts and products derived from natural sources. >>
markedly

August 2015

28 August 2015
Sex isn’t always easy for people with psoriasis. Even if you have a happy relationship, having psoriasis can be a big dampener on your sex life. The biggest roadblocks includes feeling unattractive and experiencing pain. This article suggests ways of dealing with these issues. >>
markedly
21 August 2015
In a study by the National Psoriasis Foundation, it was found that 50 per cent of respondents say their psoriasis significantly affects their emotional well-being. Left undealt with, such feelings may well lead to depression which can further impede your psoriasis treatment. This article gives you practical advice on what to do if you see symptoms of depression. >>
markedly
19 August 2015
Areas of our body where we have skin folds can be quite a headache for people with psoriasis. Perspiration can cause psoriasis flare-ups and moisture build up can further aggravate the skin causing skin cracks and infection. Here are ways to manage these areas to minimise the risk of psoriasis flares.
markedly
14 August 2015
Psoriasis being a highly visible condition can lead to self-consciousness in relationships. Do your psoriasis symptoms hold you back in your relationships? Sabrina Skiles is proof that dating with psoriasis can still lead to a happy relationship. Read her story. >>
markedly
7 August 2015
People with psoriasis are familiar with that annoying itch that often comes with the condition. Not giving in to the urge to scratch is much easier said than done. But scratching it may aggravate your condition. So, what do you do? This article gives you 8 tips on how to relieve that itch. >>
markedly
5 August 2015
The thing about flare-ups is that they don’t have any sense of timing. That’s why they happen when you least want them to, like before a job interview or a major social occasion. But there are steps you can take and lifestyle changes which can help reduce their occurrence and their severity. >>
markedly

July 2015

31 July 2015
In a breakthrough study, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have zeroed in on four proteins out of 50,000 proteins in the human body that are most likely to contribute to psoriasis, an auto-immune disorder which affects up to 3 percent of the world population. This finding dramatically helps advance efforts to understand how psoriasis develops and in turn how to stop it. >>
markedly
24 July 2015
For people with psoriasis, minor infections and injuries like bug bites and cuts can also lead to psoriasis flares. This all boils down to the Koebner phenomenon, a reaction that causes new psoriasis plaques to form wherever you experience a skin infection or injury. It definitely makes managing psoriasis more difficult than it already is. This article tells you more about the phenomenon, triggers and how to avoid Koebner lesions. >>
markedly
22 July 2015
One of the more difficult aspects of life with psoriasis is that patients are more likely to suffer from other medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, obesity or insulin resistance. Here are a few screening tests for consideration to help you manage your health better. >>
markedly
17 July 2015
The news that you’re faced with a lifetime of psoriasis is indeed hard to handle. What you need to know is that long periods of remission with no psoriasis symptoms is possible when your treatment is successful. Spontaneous remission without treatment where your immune system stops attacking your own cells is also possible. This article tells you more. >>
markedly
10 July 2015
Apples and onions are two of nature’s best sources of bioflavonoid quercetin which helps fight inflammation. Here we have a simple apple and onion soup recipe for you to try. Even if there’s no scientific evidence that there’s any link between diet and psoriasis, there’s absolutely no harm in indulging in some healthy soup. >>
markedly
8 July 2015
So your doctor has just confirmed what you may have already suspected. The red areas on your arms and elbows are not an allergic reaction but a chronic skin condition called psoriasis. Here are steps you can take once you’ve overcome your initial shock to help you live better with the condition. >>
markedly
3 July 2015
How perky you feel when you’re awake hinges very much on how good a night’s sleep you get. When you go to bed, your bedtime habits and day to day lifestyle have enormous impact on your quality of sleep each night. The secret is to experiment and find out works best for you. Everyone is different and what works for your friend may not work for you. Here are a few tips to help you sleep better and stay sharper all day long. >>
markedly

June 2015

26 June 2015
People with moderate to severe psoriasis are at increased risk for chronic kidney disease and need to be closely monitored for kidney problems, a large new study with patient follow-up over a 7 year period suggests. Researchers also found that the risk of chronic kidney disease linked to psoriasis increases with age. >>
markedly
24 June 2015
Moderate and regular exercises are recommended for psoriatic arthritis sufferers as they facilitate joint movements, thereby helping to alleviate pain, increase a patient’s range of motion and encourage weight loss. This article suggests some exercises which are helpful in developing flexibility, muscle strength and cardiovascular performance. >>
markedly
19 June 2015
David Chandler has lived with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis for many years. In this article he talks about the dilemma that faces people with these conditions – how do you live a life as normal as possible with a disease that has no cure currently and also one that can be a 24 hour and 365 days a year condition. He raises questions on treatment, side effects of drugs and learning to cope with boundaries. Ultimately, he concludes that “it’s how we think others sees us that causes the most pain.” >>
markedly
12 June 2015
Inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis may result from abnormal activation of cell death pathways previously believed to suppress inflammation. This was a surprise finding by Associate Professor James Rickard and his colleagues from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute while investing how cell death pathways are linked to inflammatory disease development. Further studies may lead to new therapies and relief for psoriasis patients with reduced side-effects. >>
markedly
10 June 2015
Good lifestyle habits and proper treatment can help you live a full and active life despite having psoriatic arthritis. The objective in managing your condition is to aim for remission, where you get better control of symptoms and a return to normal function. This article gives you tips to manage your condition. >>
markedly
5 June 2015
The benefits of exercise for overall mental and physical health cannot be emphasized enough. However, staying focused and adhering to an exercise regime can be difficult. How often do we put off that run with a trivial excuse? Here are 10 ways to boost your exercise motivation to keep you on that treadmill. >>
markedly

May 2015

29 May 2015
There may be no scientific links between diet and your psoriasis but it never hurts to eat healthy. Romaine lettuce and carrots provide a very good source of pro-vitamin A and vitamin C. Both are well touted as key nutrients for combating psoriasis. Salmon on the other hand has strong anti-inflammatory properties. A healthy and easy meal which you can easily pack for lunch if you’re looking for healthier options than that bowl of soup noodles at the hawker centre. >>
markedly
27 May 2015
As a psoriasis patient, have you ever wondered about the possibility of getting psoriatic arthritis as well? This article tells you more about your chances of developing psoriatic arthritis; the symptoms to look out for; and the different types of psoriatic arthritis. >>
markedly
22 May 2015
Since psoriasis is an immune disorder, it goes to say that the stronger an immune system you have, the better your chances are of fighting it off. There are many foods that can help strengthen one’s immune system. Adding foods high in antioxidants such as Vitamin E, Vitamin C and beta-carotene in your daily diet will keep your immune system strong. >>
markedly
15 May 2015
Though researchers are not sure if the act of laughing really makes people feel better, Steve Wilson, MA, CSP, a psychologist and laughter therapist says: "I believe that if people can get more laughter in their lives, they are a lot better off." He discusses what happens when we laugh, the impact it has on our bodies and if laughter is indeed the best medicine. >>
markedly
8 May 2015
Research by Canadian and Israeli researchers published in Arthritis Care & Research has shown that people with psoriatic arthritis face a higher risk of Vitamin D deficiency. If you live in climates with low sunlight or spend a lot of time indoors, deficiencies are common. Vitamin D plays a variety of roles in maintaining health including bone formation, reducing inflammation and is associated with several other auto-immune diseases. Psoriatic arthritis patients should consult your doctor and do a simple blood test to determine your level of Vitamin D and discuss taking supplements. >>
markedly
1 May 2015
Did you know that deep breathing is one of the best ways to lower stress in your body? When you breathe deeply, it sends a message to your brain to calm down and relax. The brain then sends this message to your body to lower the heart rate and blood pressure which goes up when you’re stressed. >>
markedly

April 2015

24 April 2015
Some medications can make your psoriasis worse. Check your medicine cabinet to see if you’re taking cardiovascular medications such as beta-blockers and NSAIDs listed in this article. And if you are and are experiencing negative reactions for your psoriasis, your doctor may be able to suggest alternative treatments for your health conditions that won’t aggravate your psoriasis. >>
markedly
17 April 2015
Recent research published in JAMA Dermatology confirms association between psoriasis and cardiovascular health. In this study with 13,000 adults in UK, it was found that those with severe psoriasis were 48 per cent more likely to have poorly controlled blood pressure versus people without the condition. Dr Junko Takeshita, a clinical instructor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, said that chronic inflammation could be a denominator although we do not fully understand why there’s a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psoriasis.
markedly
10 April 2015
Psoriasis affecting the scalp often presents with redness and scaling of the scalp. Scalp psoriasis can mimic dandruff. Scalp psoriasis usually presents with thick and well dermarcated patches with silvery scales on the scalp and may appear like a severe case of dandruff. In milder cases of scalp psoriasis, it can present like dandruff. However, the commonest cause of dandruff is seborrhoiec dermatitis. Psoriasis and seborrhoiec dermatitis are two distinct conditions. Psoriasis usually affects more than one area of the body and most often, the scales of psoriasis are thicker and somewhat drier in appearance than are the scales of seborrheic dermatitis. >>
markedly
3 April 2015
As psoriasis is a life-long condition, many people with psoriasis may resort to trying some form of complementary therapies to help manage the symptoms. As with medical treatments, individual responses to complementary therapies may vary. However, unlike medical treatments complementary therapies are not regulated for safety. Caution needs to be exercised if you’re dappling in this area. This article highlights some of the things you need to look out for when considering complementary therapy. >>
markedly

March 2015

27 March 2015
Whether your treatment is working for you all depends on your expectations and what “working” means to you. Some are happy to feel less itch or see the redness fading whilst others want to see a 100 per cent clearance. Set realistic goals and give your therapy time to work. On average, it takes about 3 months for the treatment to show effect. And, no treatment can work without your co-operation. Adherence to your prescribed treatment is key to finding the right treatment for you. >>
markedly
20 March 2015
Your self esteem is determined by your thoughts, relationships and experiences. When affected by psoriasis, your self esteem can take a hard knock. Learn what self esteem is all about and how having a positive self esteem can lead to better mental well-being, confidence and resilience. Understanding how you view yourself and your abilities and limitations may help you develop better self esteem. >>
markedly
13 March 2015
New research has discovered the underlying genetic factors that help repair skin lesions caused by psoriasis. A gene called “grainyhead” important to wound healing and epidermal development – triggers a repair pathway for psoriasis lesions. When this gene is eliminated, it was found that the severity and longevity of the patches increased. This suggests that targeting this particular mechanism may lead to new treatment and solutions which will help limit the itchy and painful lesions caused by the condition. >>
markedly
6 March 2015
People with psoriasis not only deal with the physical impact of the condition but also bear the mental strain of living with and managing the condition. Up to 33 per cent of individuals with psoriasis can suffer from depression as compared to 7 per cent for the general population. Managing your emotional health is as important as taking care of your psoriatic condition. Dealing with your emotions of anger, frustration and sadness as you go through periods of flare-ups and remission is your key to living well with psoriasis. >>
markedly

February 2015

27 February 2015
Obesity is a common companion to psoriasis. Psoriasis patients often battle to try and find the right diet to help them maintain sustainable weight loss. It’s been cited that 95 per cent of people fail in their diet. This article asked that we consider the reverse – actually, 95 per cent of the diets fail people because they are often synonymous with suffering. Sustainable weight loss with the right diet for you is possible! What we need to do is move the goalposts, stop thinking that diets requiring us to suffer can last and that every last pound must be shed before we consider it a success. >>
markedly
20 February 2015
Psoriatic arthritis can affect any joints in your body but it is common that it would impact the joints in the feet. When this happens, your toes may swell and become sausage-like and inflammation may also damage your nails causing pitting, ridging and peeling away from the nail bed. It may also result in soreness in your sole or heel making walking a painful task. Treatment, simple stretches and finding the right shoes can bring you much needed relief. >>
markedly
18 February 2015
Playing sport is a great way to stay healthy and keep in shape. Regardless of the type of activity you engage in, you will benefit from increased fitness, co-ordination and self-confidence. Generally, your psoriasis should not prevent you from participating in sport. However everybody’s condition is different and some activities might not be suitable to some psoriasis patients. You will need to try the activity a few times to see how it impacts on your condition. >>
markedly
13 February 2015
There are 6 types of psoriatic arthritis. They are namely Asymmetrical oligoarticular arthritis - arthritis that involves a few joints but not necessarily the same joints on both sides of the body or other similar joints on the same side of the body; Symmetrical polyarthritis - arthritis that involves similar joints on both sides of the body, much like rheumatoid arthritis; Distal interphalangeal arthropathy - arthritis in the joints at the ends of the fingers and toes; Arthritis mutilans - a long-term form of destructive psoriatic arthritis in which the joints are severely damaged and deformities can be seen, especially in the hands and feet; Spondylitis - inflammation of the vertebrae in the spine with or without inflammation of the sacroiliac joint in the pelvis and inflammation of the hip; and Juvenile psoriatic arthritis - psoriatic arthritis that affects children. >>
markedly
6 February 2015
Both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are thought to be caused by a disorder of the immune system which causes skin cells to multiply at an accelerated rate. Some 30 per cent of people with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis. However, psoriatic arthritis symptoms can appear before skin plagues or lesion. Psoriasis is characterized by red inflamed skin and plaques with silvery scale whilst symptoms of psoriatic arthritis include painful swollen joints and tendon attachments to the bone. >>
markedly
4 February 2015
There are those who believe passionately that the organic lifestyle is the key to good health. So what exactly is organic food? Organic food is produced by organic farming – a heavily regulated activity which ensures much more than just not using chemicals and pesticides. The key question is “should psoriasis patients eat organic food?” Read on to find out more. >>
markedly

January 2015

30 January 2015
Practise your favourite stress soothers. Stress can make aches and pains worse. “Stress is a factor in psoriatic arthritis flares and can exacerbate existing symptoms,” Eric L. Matteson, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine says. Whether it’s deep breathing, meditation, or listening to music, doing activities that help you take the edge off is key. “Hobbies help, too,” he says. “Choose a hobby that matches your physical ability." Learn other methods to keep stress at bay.>>
markedly
23 January 2015
Not everyone responds emotionally through the skin, nor do all people react the same way to having a skin problem. But evidence suggests that in some people, psychological issues often intersect with skin physiology, and treating both may offer the best chance for improvement. When feelings of anxiety or depression intrude, medications such as antidepressants may be recommended. Many nonpharmacologic interventions, including mind-body techniques, have shown promise, though most studies are small and uncontrolled. Some approaches have effects that are not disease-specific but general — reducing stress and anxiety, improving the patient's sense of control, and enhancing immune function.>>
markedly
21 January 2015
No one knows for sure what causes psoriasis and there is no easy answer as to whether psoriasis will be passed on from generation to generation. However, the pattern of the disease does show there is a high chance of a person having psoriasis if your relatives have the disease. A study involving 3,000 families in which one or both parents had psoriasis confirmed the hereditary nature of the disease and the risk of having the illness is twice as high if both parents have psoriasis. >>
markedly
16 January 2015
On the importance of mindfulness in improving the health of people with long term conditions, lead author Dr. Peter Coventry pointed out that mindfulness-based interventions appear to be an acceptable and effective way for some people with long-term conditions to regain a sense of balance and self-determination in their lives. This positive state of mind allows patients to accept their limitations and focus on what is achievable in the present rather than worrying about the past or what they might not be able to do in the future. Thus, mindfulness is a means to help people self-manage their illness and it has the potential to offer people long-term benefits if practiced regularly and built into their daily routines.>>
markedly
9 January 2015
Learn ways to motivate yourself into adopting a healthier way of life and better manage your healing process. Firstly, consider the consequences of not following a healing regime. Secondly, think about what you will gain when you embark on a healthier lifestyle. Lastly, focus on small successes and celebrate it with family and friends. Your health is your greatest wealth and don't ever give up!>>
markedly
7 January 2015
Living with psoriasis can be tough, especially when it comes to work. Many patients report missing work days and reduced productivity due to flare-ups. The more severe the condition, the greater the impact on one’s long term capacity to work and financial health. Take heart as it’s not all bad news. With proper treatment, the situation can improve. >>
markedly
2 January 2015
Optimism seems to reduce stress-induced inflammation and levels of stress hormones such as cortisol. It may also reduce susceptibility to disease by dampening sympathetic nervous system activity and stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system which in turn, aids to rest the body. So taking a rosy view of the future means a rosy view of yourself.>>
markedly

December 2014

26 December 2014
With psoriasis, there are days when you feel completely drained and struggle to keep going. How can you boost your energy level? According to this article in Harvard Men’s Health Watch activities like pacing, taking powernaps and eating healthily can help you lift your waning energy. One thing that does not work is overhyped dietary supplement. If your fatigue is not caused by a medical condition, here are a few steps to help you become more energetic.>>
markedly
19 December 2014
You don’t have to be a "born optimist" to use the power of optimism. In daily life, or when faced with a crisis or stress during the holidays, choose a positive viewpoint to make the most of what life brings your way. With realistic optimism, you look at the "big picture," the good and the bad. Next, you decide what is realistic to expect. Then decide what you can do to make things go as well as possible. Lastly, focus on the positives.>>
markedly
17 December 2014
There are many anecdotal stories about psoriasis patients who have found relief from their condition by taking fish oils which contain Omega-3 fatty acids. While there may be some overall benefits to taking fish oils, it is important that psoriasis patients understand what they are and how they work. According to the US National Psoriasis Foundation, the research on whether Omega-3 fatty acid supplements can help reduce the severity of psoriasis is mixed and more long-term clinical controlled studies are needed. >>
markedly
12 December 2014
Sleep will now be the best excuse for everyone during this holiday season. In study published in June 2014, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center show for the first time that sleep after learning encourages the growth of dendritic spines, the tiny protrusions from brain cells that connect to other brain cells and facilitate the passage of information across synapses, the junctions at which brain cells meet. Moreover, the activity of brain cells during deep sleep, or slow-wave sleep, after learning is critical for such growth.>>
markedly
5 December 2014
Stress exist all year long, but it can be exacerbated for some people by the pressure to get everything done and everybody happy for the festive season. For some, it can also be the travel stress to cold temperatures. Always remember to avoid going overboard on holiday indulgences such as alcohol and sweet desserts. Pick up a few tips to control your stress levels, which may improve your psoriasis symptoms.>>
markedly

November 2014

28 November 2014
In December 2013, a group of scientists, supported by The Rockefeller University, found that the IL-17 and TNF cytokines were disrupting the pigment production of patients’ melanocytes. Melanocytes are the cells that produce melanin pigment that gives skin its color. The researchers treated normal human melanocytes with IL-17 and TNF, and found that the two cytokines worked together to suppress melanin production. These findings point to clear implications for the design of future therapies to address a set of common skin disorders.>>
markedly
21 November 2014
Environmental contaminants can trigger psoriasis and other autoimmune disorders, and it is thought that a protein called the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which senses environmental toxins, could play a role. A new study in June 2014 shows that the severity of inflammation associated with psoriasis is unexpectedly suppressed by AhR which reduces psoriasis gene expression. The findings suggest that stimulation of AhR could improve symptoms and may represent a new strategy for treating chronic inflammatory skin disorders. >>
markedly
19 November 2014
For those who missed the Cover Up For Confidence Workshop, here’s an article about the event. Attendees enjoyed a skincare and make-up demonstration by Covermark and Dr Raymond Kwah dispelled myths about psoriasis and explained triggers and treatment options. Look out for our next workshop and come and meet other people with psoriasis to form a support group that will be your pillar of strength in your journey with the condition.
markedly
12 November 2014
More than 30,000 Singaporeans over a period of two weeks have joined the social media campaign designed to debunk the myth that psoriasis is contagious. The campaign by the Psoriasis Association of Singapore is called #PSingapore, and is based on the unusual spelling of the word ‘psoriasis’ and the distinctive silent ‘P’. Social media users are encouraged to post photos of themselves holding ‘#P’ signs in front of words that start with the letter ‘S’, applying the strange silent ‘p’ spelling in psoriasis to the world around them to raise awareness. >>
markedly
7 November 2014
A surge of more than 200 mobile apps related to dermatology has allowed smart phone users all over the world to track and diagnose a wide range of skin diseases but doctors are urging caution, according to a recent study. This is yet an area where patients need to be cautious because there are no regulations and no guarantees that these apps are providing accurate medical information. Medical consultation is needed to confirm a definite diagnosis.>>
markedly

October 2014

1 October 2014
Travel is very much part and parcel of our modern lifestyle. Be it for work or play, most of us find ourselves on a plane heading overseas at some point. However travelling for psoriasis patients may be more cumbersome due to the challenges of the condition. Take the following steps to enjoy your travel and keep it psoriasis-worry free! >>
markedly

September 2014

26 September 2014
If you have psoriasis, consider several factors before you ink your body. Tattooing involves puncturing your skin and injecting a foreign substance into it. This means that there is always the potential for an infection or allergic reactions such as itching and redness. You can potentially be infected with blood-borne diseases, such as hepatitis and HIV, which can be passed from person to person via dirty needles. Remember that a tattoo cannot cover up your plaques -- the raised, red, scaly patches of skin caused by psoriasis. >>
markedly
19 September 2014
Research suggests circulatory system influences diseases such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. New research in mice suggests that a molecule linked to clogged arteries might activate the immune system to the point where it harms the body. The findings may explain why clogged arteries, a condition called atherosclerosis, have been tied to autoimmune disorders, which develop when the immune system goes awry.>>
markedly
17 September 2014
Having a visible condition like psoriasis affects the child’s perception of their body image. They often cannot control the urge to scratch, which results in bleeding wounds. They might also be teased by their peers about their skin. This can really damage their self-esteem. Here are the three E’s of Parenting to help you be a better parent to your child who has psoriasis. >>
markedly
12 September 2014
Cellulitis is a skin infection that starts when bacteria, often a variety of staph or strep, get into the deeper layers of the skin. Psoriatic skin which are often irritated, flaky and inflamed, often worsened by scratching, are the perfect entry points for these bacteria. There’s also some evidence that psoriasis medications like TNF blockers that suppress the immune system may increase a person’s risk for cellulitis. If you have psoriasis and you're prone to infections, try these simple steps to avoid future incidents.>>
markedly
12 September 2014
Exercise – we should all do more of it. Even if you’re a very motivated person, it can be tough to get yourself off the couch. But it’s even more difficult for psoriasis patients. Rather than suffering the stares of people at the gym or covering up with a sweat suit, many with psoriasis find it’s easier just to stay home.>>
markedly
5 September 2014
The last decade has seen some promising advances in the treatment of psoriasis. Systemic medications called biologics -- because they are made from living organisms -- may offer hope to people who haven't had success with other approaches or who are concerned about the toxicity of other medicines. Drugs like methotrexate and cyclosporine also affect the immune system, but they are far more likely to cause serious side effects. New biologic drugs are apparently more focused in their effects. >>
markedly
3 September 2014
Helping a friend or relative to cope with psoriasis is about more than just understanding their medical condition. Caring goes beyond understanding. It entails physical support, emotional support and sometimes even spiritual support. Here are tips to help you be that pillar of support that your loved one can depend on. >>
markedly

August 2014

29 August 2014
Women susceptible to psoriasis may want to put down the stout and reach for a light beer. A new study finds that drinking regular beer increases the risk of psoriasis in women by over 70 percent. In 2010, researchers used 1,069 diagnoses for analysis and determined that women who reported averaging at least 2.3 drinks per week had a 72 percent greater risk of psoriasis than women who did not drink. However, they also found no association between psoriasis risk and light beer, red wine, white wine or liquor. >>
markedly
22 August 2014
Scientists led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the first gene directly linked to plaque psoriasis - the most common form of psoriasis affecting up to 80 per cent of cases of psoriasis. Rare mutations in the CARD14 gene, when activated by an environmental trigger can lead to plaque psoriasis. The findings also indicate that mutations in CARD14 can be involved in the pustular form of psoriasis and in a debilitating arthritis linked to the psoriasis. The discovery may lead to more effective, targeted therapies for plaque psoriasis and other forms of the disease. >>
markedly
20 August 2014
Having psoriasis should not be a deterrent in your decision to have children as psoriasis is a manageable disease. With pre-planning and support from your friends and family, it is possible for men and women with psoriasis to start a family. >>
markedly
15 August 2014
Fumaric acid salts have been in use against severe psoriasis for a long time. Neurologists involved in this study believe that fumaric acid salts detoxify radicals and protect nerve and glial cells. This is significant because both fumarates and interferon do not contain any known long-term unlike many modern strong therapies for multiple sclerosis. >>
markedly
8 August 2014
This study used the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data to determine the systemic medications prescribed for psoriasis from 1989 to 2010. They found that systemic corticosteroids were prescribed at 650,000 of 21 million psoriasis visits. Of these prescriptions, 93 percent were from dermatologists. Corticosteroids were the second most commonly prescribed systemic medication for psoriasis, despite the warnings and concerns about use of systemic corticosteroids. >>
markedly
6 August 2014
Psoriasis patients have been observed to fall into a cycle of despair and isolation that is further exacerbated by their low self-esteem and poor adjustment stemming from the social stigmatisation of the disease. It is important to develop healthy coping mechanisms to keep the blues away. >>
markedly
1 August 2014
Robert E. Kalb, M.D., a clinical professor of dermatology in Buffalo, N.Y., says that six separate meta-analyses have concluded that psoriasis is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is important to clarify that the comorbidities – especially cardiovascular disease – only affect patients with severe psoriasis, or psoriasis covering 10 percent or more of the body surface area. >>
markedly

July 2014

25 July 2014
A study in the UK has concluded that GPs need enhanced training to help them to manage patients with psoriasis, a chronic auto-immune condition with complex socio-psycho implications and comorbidities. It was concluded that clinicians do not feel skilled or confident in supporting psoriasis patients to change their lifestyle to help them better manage their condition, mood and behaviour so as to improve their quality of life. Patients also reported a need for doctors to recognize that psoriasis was more than a skin complaint. >>
markedly
18 July 2014
Researchers at King's College London have identified a new gene (PIM1), which could be an effective target for innovative treatments and therapies for the autoimmune disease, psoriasis. The most exciting part of the study was that detailed analysis of genes induced by IL-22, a protein that sends messages between cells - in skin inflammation would allow researchers to uncover a novel treatment target for psoriasis.>>
markedly
16 July 2014
An online psoriasis patient support group utilizes the internet to connect members. Via this platform, patients, doctors and members can communicate and share with one another. Information pertaining to psoriasis - treatment options, practical advice and helpful tips – can be found in the group. Help is just a click away. >>
markedly
11 July 2014
The sensation of itching is hardwired into the nervous system and can be traced back to a small molecule released in the spinal cord, according to a 2013 study in mice. Researchers say this molecule, known as natriuretic polypeptide b (Nppb), triggers a signal that passes through the central nervous system. Ultimately, this signal is experienced as an itch. The findings might someday help scientists develop treatments for chronic itch conditions, such eczema and psoriasis. >>
markedly
4 July 2014
A recent study with 130 adults showed that psoriasis has negative impacts on the quality of life of both the psoriasis patients as well as the people who live with them. It was found that the quality of life scores of cohabitants were closely linked with the scores of the patients. And up to 88 percent of the cohabitants reported psoriasis impaired their quality of life. Both groups tend to report more depression and anxiety than people not affected by psoriasis. The authors say their results suggest that doctors who treat patients with psoriasis should use a more integrated approach that takes family members into consideration. >>
markedly
2 July 2014
Adolescence can be both angst ridden and emotionally traumatic as you straddle childhood and adulthood. Throw in psoriasis and you have double the load that your friends have on their plate. But know this – you can come up tops and live a normal life – just like everyone else. >>
markedly

June 2014

27 June 2014
Parasites are not all bad, according to a team of research scientists at the University of Georgia, the Harvard School of Public Health, the Université François Rabelais in Tours, France, and the Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China. Their study demonstrates that once inside a host, many parasitic worms secrete a sugar-based anti-inflammatory molecule that might actually help treat metabolic disorders associated with obesity. In addition, the sugar molecule may alleviate a number of other serious inflammatory medical conditions and may work as a treatment for psoriasis. >>
markedly
20 June 2014
Study at the National Center for Biotechnology Information found omega-3, in addition to playing a crucial role in human growth and brain development, may be highly useful in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ulcers, psoriasis, lupus, multiple sclerosis and migraine. Paradoxically, however, an excess of omega 6 may actually result in greater inflammation. So have a healthy diet that achieves a proper balance between omega-3 and omega-6.>>
markedly
13 June 2014
An effective treatment for plaque-type psoriasis can be found in traditional Chinese medicine. Yin-Ku Lin, M.D. (Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan) and colleagues found that an ointment based on the dark-blue, plant-based powder indigo naturalis can be used treat the skin condition.>>
markedly
6 June 2014
Learn more about the risks and benefits of sun exposure, ultraviolet light and the types of sun protection available to psoriasis patients. This website provides a helpful guide to those who wants to find out more about sun sensitivity, how to choose the right type of sun protection and the risks involved in using tanning beds. >>
markedly

May 2014

30 May 2014
Researchers have found that smoking increases the risk of developing psoriasis, heavier smoking increases the risk further, and the risk decreases only slowly after quitting. Furthermore, exposure to passive smoke during pregnancy or childhood was associated with an increased risk of psoriasis. The risk of psoriasis among former smokers decreases nearly to that of never smokers 20 years after cessation. >>
markedly
23 May 2014
A world-leading taskforce led by The University of Manchester has begun work to create a new test to help medics work out which treatment plan is most likely to improve the disabling skin condition psoriasis, based on a patient's individual biological make-up. The team, known as Psoriasis Stratification to Optimise Relevant Therapy (PSORT) is a unique partnership between leading universities, pharmaceutical and diagnostics companies and the Psoriasis Association and NHS partners representing patients.>>
markedly
16 May 2014
Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4i) -- commonly used to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes-- may also reduce the risk of autoimmune diseases in these patients. Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston hypothesised that patients with type 2 diabetes starting a DPP4i would have a reduced risk of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. This could lead to a potential role of DPP4i as a novel therapy for several inflammatory diseases by inhibiting T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. >>
markedly
9 May 2014
Based on responses from a survey of 60 women with moderate to severe psoriasis, the specific complaints that were the most common ways in which psoriasis interfered with sexual activity were itchiness (19%), the need to adjust sexual position (10%), and bleeding (9%), Dr. Cather reported at the Skin Disease Education Foundation’s annual dermatology seminar in the U.S. >>
markedly
2 May 2014
Research involving a survey of 90,000 women in the US shows that the women who were physically active had a lower multivariate relative risk of psoriasis (0.72) compared with the least active. Walking was not associated with a reduced risk. It appears the exercise must be vigorous.>>
markedly

April 2014

25 April 2014
An international team of scientists led at UC San Diego's Division of Dermatology analysed skin biopsies of patients with and without psoriasis and discovered that a molecule called regenerating islet-derived protein 3-alpha (REG3A) is highly expressed in skin cells during psoriasis and wound-healing, but not under normal skin conditions. The discovery of REG3A's dual roles provides a new target for different therapies. >>
markedly
18 April 2014
A study by Sanford-Burnham scientists have identified the B and T Lymphocyte Attenuator (BTLA) inhibitory receptor as a key factor in limiting inflammatory responses, particularly in the skin. They discovered that BTLA acts as a critical coordinator for turning T-cells off to prevent the immune system from spinning out of control, and helping to rebalance the immune system. The findings could lead to new treatments for inflammatory disorders. >>
markedly
11 April 2014
A study by researchers with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggested that patients with severe psoriasis may have greatest risk for developing diabetes even if they don't have common risk factors such as obesity. Researchers estimate that an additional 115,500 people will develop diabetes each year due to the risk posed by psoriasis above and beyond conventional risk factors. >>
markedly
10 April 2014
Do you want to look and feel your best for that important interview, first date or client meeting? A little makeup can go a long way when it comes to covering the red, raised patches that signal psoriasis and boosting your confidence.<br/>reedom 360 brings you an exclusive workshop by CoverMark, a derma cosmetic company on the do’s and don’ts in using derma cosmetic to cover up the redness and coarseness of psoriatic skin.<br/>Open for registration till 20 April, 2014. >>
markedly
4 April 2014
When the right micro-organisms are at work, immune cells involved in the development of autoimmune illnesses like psoriasis, multiple sclerosis and arthritis can develop anti-inflammatory properties. Particular fungi activate the immune cells involved in the development of certain illnesses, whereas other microorganisms, in particular bacteria that are found naturally on our skin, lend an anti-inflammatory function to them. >>
markedly

March 2014

28 March 2014
Adjusting your diet might help to manage the uncomfortable symptoms of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Patients have different triggers specific to them. Cutting back on the amount of sugar in your diet may ease psoriatic arthritis flare-ups. Instead, eat fibre-rich strawberries or your favourite fruits to stave off your sweet cravings. Reduce intake of red meats which can elevate your cholesterol levels and in turn, increase your joint pain. Read for more tips on food that you can avoid during flare-ups >>
markedly
21 March 2014
Many patients have found that the traditional Eastern practice of acupuncture very helpful in relieving their chronic pain and aches. A session of acupuncture can help you to release muscle tension and make you feel more relaxed. Acupuncture involves the insertion of very thin needles through the patient's skin at specific points on the body. The needles are inserted to various depths and usually do not cause pain to the patient. >>
markedly
14 March 2014
Studies on survivors of post-traumatic stress disorder suggest they have elevated levels of stress hormones, as do students at exam time. In these groups of people and others experiencing loneliness, anger, trauma and relationship problems, infection last longer and wounds take longer to heal. However, having fun with friends and family seems to have the opposite effect on our immune systems. >>
markedly
7 March 2014
Many of us have heard that garlic is good for overall health. One of the benefits of garlic can be linked to its ability to inhibit the activity of lipoxygenase, an enzyme that is known to cause an inflammatory cascade in the presence of arachidonic acid. People with inflammatory psoriasis have been reported to have high levels of arachidonic acid in their adipose tissues and skin. >>
markedly

February 2014

28 February 2014
Ultraviolet light is a proven treatment for psoriasis, one of humanity’s oldest known diseases. Sunshine can also beat back the chronic autoimmune disorder of the skin. But explaining light’s therapeutic effects has been difficult. A clinical trial under way at the Center for Clinical and Translational Science in The Rockefeller University Hospital will literally shine light on the disease in hopes of finding out. >>
markedly
21 February 2014
Three new studies suggest salt may be a prime suspect in a wide range of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS), psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis (arthritis of the spine). A significant increase in the incidence of autoimmune diseases suggests that environmental factors, and not genetics, may explain the trend, the researchers noted. >>
markedly
14 February 2014
Being open and honest is the key. Be direct about it as early as possible, says Diane Talbert, who has lived with psoriasis for 46 years and developed psoriatic arthritis 20 years ago. "Communicate with your spouse or significant other. If you don't let them know how you feel, they will never know. My husband always asks what he can do to help. >>
markedly
7 February 2014
So which nutrients do you need to keep your skin healthy and looking its best? The experts interviewed by WebMD, plus new information from the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), have highlighted the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and other nutrients that can nourish your skin, whether you take them in supplement form, apply them directly to you skin, or make sure you get enough from the foods you eat.>>
markedly

January 2014

31 January 2014
Queen Mary University of London is partnering with various associations and related companies to create a new test which helps pinpoint the most effective treatment to tackle the skin condition psoriasis. The partnership will develop a targeted approach to psoriasis treatment – an approach also known as stratified medicine – with the aim of eventually using the test to help millions of patients who suffer from the painful skin condition. They aim to use cutting-edge techniques to assess factors -- such as drug levels in the body, genetic make-up, skin and blood differences -- which may affect how successful various psoriasis treatments are for individuals.
markedly
24 January 2014
New research has found that use of antibiotics in early childhood may increase the risk of developing eczema by up to 40%. The study, published in the British Journal of Dermatology, showed that children with eczema are more likely to have been treated with antibiotics in their first year of life. The research also revealed that each additional course of antibiotics may increase the risk of eczema by a further 7%. It was found that infants are more likely to develop eczema if they had antibiotics within their first year of life, but not prenatally.
markedly
17 January 2014
A novel combination anti-psoriasis therapy has potential for superior and longer-lasting therapeutic effects than current topical treatments by targeting genetic abnormalities in deeper layers of the skin. The medical team’s goal was to reconstitute the balance between skin and immune system in psoriatic plaques so that the vicious cycle within skin over activation and immune hypersensitivity in the deeper dermal layers can be reduced. They aim to develop a once-a-day application with the therapeutic effects lasting longer than current topical treatment, which currently needs to be applied multiple times a day.
markedly
10 January 2014
Adults who developed psoriasis as children are at no greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease or diabetes. While research continues to link psoriatic diseases with an increased risk for other health conditions – also known as comorbidities – developing psoriasis before age 20 does not seem to make a difference in that risk, according to the study published in October in the British Journal of Dermatology. In fact, the study indicates that those who developed psoriasis as children actually are less likely to develop cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities such as heart disease and diabetes.
markedly
10 January 2014
Genetic variants associated with increased susceptibility to psoriasis are reported in five papers published online in Nature Genetics. The study identified six regions of the genome newly associated with psoriasis, and found evidence for an interaction between two associated regions -- HLA-C and ERAP1. "We need to understand why psoriasis occurs and why individuals are more likely to develop the condition. Through our research, and other studies now coming through, the research community have identified genes that play a role in people's susceptibility to the condition.”
markedly
10 January 2014
Closer monitoring for kidney problems are recommended for patients if they have more than 3% of their body surface affected by psoriasis. Reported by BMJ, a healthcare knowledge provider in UK, the researchers found that patients with psoriasis, particularly those with severe disease, were at greater risk of developing moderate to advanced (stage 3 to 5) chronic kidney disease compared with control patients. Furthermore, those with severe psoriasis were nearly twice as likely to develop chronic kidney disease and were more than four times as likely to develop end stage renal disease requiring dialysis.
markedly